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Professor Franklin Aigbirhio, who leads DPUK's Imaging Network, has been elected as a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

Professor Franklin Aigbirhio, who is developing new fluorescent molecules for use in PET-MR scanners.

The Academy of Medical Sciences is the independent body in the UK representing the medical sciences. Its elected Fellows are the UK's leading medical scientists from hospitals, academia, industry and the public service.

Professor Aigbirhio is Professor of Molecular Imaging Chemistry at the University of Cambridge. His research focuses on the development and application of new biomedical imaging technologies for clinical research in areas such as dementia, acute brain injury and hypertension. This work seeks to enable earlier detection and a greater understanding of the disorders, thereby aiding the development of new treatments. 

He said: 'It's a pleasure and honour to be elected to this Fellowship, which I recognise is an outcome of the collaborations with many talented colleagues at Cambridge and further afield, for which I give my sincere thanks. Going forward, my election to the Fellowship provides a platform to highlight the role of black researchers and participants in biomedical and health research and to increase their involvement.'

Professor Aigbirhio leads the DPUK Imaging Network, which is enabling researchers across the UK to work together on brain imaging studies that will provide crucial new insights into neurological conditions such as dementia. The network includes eight state-of-the-art PET-MR scanners based at universities and hospitals around the country.

DPUK offers its warmest congratulations to Professor Aigbirhio on his Fellowship. Read more on the Academy of Medical Sciences website.