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Datathon for dementia

General Research

Data scientists from many different backgrounds combined their expertise to take on dementia in an unusual format for disease research: a three-day datathon. The intensive research event saw teams come together to work on data that is now available in the DPUK Data Portal.

DPUK approach attracts interest from beyond dementia sector

DPUK approach attracts interest from beyond dementia sector

General

Thanks to leaps forward in computing power, DPUK is able to harness highly advanced technical solutions to maintain data security and non-identifiability of millions of existing health records in the Data Portal. It’s a model that is globally unique for dementia research and one that’s increasingly attracting attention from other sectors.

Why volunteer health data will accelerate the development of treatments for dementia

Why volunteer health data will accelerate the development of treatments for dementia

General

Thanks to the generosity of two million health studies volunteers, there is new hope for accelerating the discovery of treatments for dementia. Their combined data – lifestyle, genes, memory tests, and brain scans – are helping researchers identify changes over time which will reveal how dementia starts in healthy brains.

New partner announcement: Cambridge Cognition

New partner announcement: Cambridge Cognition

General Research

Dementias Platform UK continues to expand as Cambridge Cognition, a global leader in cognitive assessment for clinical trials, upgrades its current position as associate partner to become full partner.

A step forward for dementia studies: body-worn sensors to assess how we walk

A step forward for dementia studies: body-worn sensors to assess how we walk

General Publication Research

Body-worn sensors used by people with mild Alzheimer’s to assess walking could offer a cost-effective way to detect the disease early and monitor its progression.